“The Lord said to Satan, “Very well, then, everything he has is in your power, but on the man himself do not lay a finger.” Then Satan went out from the presence of the Lord.”
‭‭Job‬ ‭1:12‬ ‭NIV‬‬
This conversation between God and Satan teaches us an important fact about God—he is fully aware of every attempt by Satan to bring suffering and difficulty upon us. While God may allow us to suffer for a reason beyond our understanding, he is never caught by surprise by our troubles and is always compassionate.(Tyndal Study Bible)
As I was meditating on this word my mind started prowling. I discovered the commentary below. I am currently reading Job in my daily devotion. Job dates to around 2000 BC. Take, the time to read it you will need a lot of time to understand the teachings. I have highlighted the last paragraph, pay careful attention. This message is powerful and for each of us. It got my attention.
This is a deeply unsettling verse. We would much rather think of God as our defender, as our protection against the enemy. How could he abandon someone to the attacks of Satan like this?
That’s the question at the heart of this book. And it’s the question that comes into the mind of every believer when they are under attack. How can God let this happen to me? How can bad things happen to good people? This is not just a personal question, it’s a question that affects the whole reality of the gospel message: If Jesus was really the Messiah, how could God let him suffer on the cross?
This message of suffering is right at the heart of the Christian message. The crucial moment of Christianity, after all, is when Jesus hung bleeding on a cross. And this is not just something Jesus did for us so that we would never have to suffer. Jesus taught, “he who does not take his cross and follow after me is not worthy of me” (Matt. 10:38). This is not about wearing cross jewelry. It’s about accepting the cross, accepting suffering in our lives.
In the Middle East, olives are a great treat and delicious to eat. But only when those olives are crushed in a press do they yield their oil, an oil used to fuel lamps and provide light in the darkness. Jesus provides light because he was pressed at Gethsemane and died at Calvary. Through his suffering, light and life have been provided to us and to the world.
The redemptive qualities of suffering are a central Christian teaching, though this topic is often neglected or even rejected. Today the gospel is often presented as a “get rich quick” scheme. But Jesus, by his life and his words, teaches us to embrace our suffering, which is really the only way to have victory over it. As it says in Heb. 12:2 of Jesus himself, “who for the joy set before him endured the cross.” He knew that there was a reason for his suffering–it was a gift of grace–and that an eternal good would come from it.
Fortunately, suffering is not the entire Christian message. Healing, victory, joy, and provision are also part of the story—and part of the story of Job, too. But God does allow suffering from time to time. Sometimes it’s only for a moment, sometimes it’s very deep and lasts a long time. But we need to understand suffering to keep the Christian message balanced. We need to learn to allow God to use suffering to change us and make us more like himself. Even Jesus, the Bible says, was “perfected” through suffering (Heb. 2:10). This is the way that Jesus taught us to live: to accept life as it comes, including its crushing hurts and pains; to carry our cross, and allow God to turn it into an eternal good. (Bible study with Jeffrey J. Harrison)
” Lord I thank you for the Word. May it touch the hearts of Your people. Amen.”