20+ Best Hunger Games Quotes: Exclusive Selection

Profoundly inspirational hunger games quotes will make you look at life differently and help you live a meaningful life.

Famous Hunger Games Quotes

Gale gave me a sense of security I’d lacked since my father’s death. His companionship replaced the long solitary hours in the woods. I became a much better hunter when I didn’t have to look over my shoulder constantly, when someone was watching my back…Being out in the woods with Gale…sometimes I was actually happy. – Suzanne Collins

I’m ashamed I never tried to help her in the woods. That I let the Capitol kill the boy and mutilate her without lifting a finger. Just like I was watching the Games. – Suzanne Collins

I stand there, feeling broken and small, thousands of eyes trained on me. There’s a long pause. Then, from somewhere in the crowd, someone whistles Rue’s four-note mocking-jay tune. The one that meant safety in the arena. – Suzanne Collins

When I was younger, I scared my mother to death, the things I would blurt out about District 12, about the people who rule our country, Panem, from the far-off city called the Capitol. Eventually I understood this would only lead us to more trouble. So I learned to hold my tongue and to turn my features into an indifferent mask so that no one could ever read my thoughts. – Suzanne Collins

As long as you can find yourself, you’ll never starve. – Suzanne Collins

As I hike along, I feel certain I’m still holding the screen in the Capitol, so I’m careful to continue to hide my emotions. But what a good time Claudius Templesmith must be having with his guest commentators, dissecting Peeta’s behavior, my reaction. What to make of it all? Has Peeta revealed his true colors? How does this affect the betting odds? Will we lose sponsors? Do we even have sponsors? Yes, I feel certain we do, or did. – Suzanne Collins

We had to save you because you’re the mockingjay, Katniss,” says Plutarch. While you live, the revolution lives. – Suzanne Collins

Rue’s death has forced me to confront my own fury against the cruelty, the injustice they inflict upon us. But here, even more strongly than at home, I feel my impotence. There’s no way to take revenge on the Capitol. Is there? – Suzanne Collins

Tonight. After the reaping, everyone is supposed to celebrate. And a lot of people do, out of relief that their children have been spared for another year. But at least two families will pull their shutters, lock their doors, and try to figure out how they will survive the painful weeks to come. – Suzanne Collins

No one will forget me. Not my look, not my name. Katniss. The girl who was on fire. – Suzanne Collins

They do surgery in the Capitol, to make people appear younger and thinner. In District 12, looking old is something of an achievement since so many people die early. You see an elderly person, you want to congratulate them on their longevity, ask the secret of survival. A plump person is envied because they aren’t scraping by like the majority of us. But [in the Capitol] it is different. Wrinkles aren’t desirable. A round belly isn’t a sign of success. – Suzanne Collins

The authorities in District 13 were against my coming back. They viewed it as a costly and pointless venture, given that at least a dozen visible hovercraft are circling overhead for my protection and there’s no intelligence to be gained. I had to see it though. – Suzanne Collins

At first one, then another, then almost every member of the crowd touches the three middle fingers of their left hand to their lips and holds it out to me. It is an old and rarely used gesture of our district, occasionally seen at funerals. It means thanks, it means admiration, it means good-bye to someone you love. – Suzanne Collins

The idea of actually losing Peeta hit me again and I realized how much I don’t want him to die. And it’s not about the sponsors. And it’s not about what will happen back home. And it’s not just that I don’t want to be alone. It’s him. I do not want to lose the boy with the bread. – Suzanne Collins

With one sweep of my arm, I push her behind me. I volunteer!” I gasp. I volunteer as tribute! – Suzanne Collins

Why don’t you just be yourself? … No one can help but admire your spirit. – Suzanne Collins

If I had just killed myself with those berries, none of this would’ve happened. Peeta could have come home and lived, and everyone else would have been safe, too.” Safe to do what?” he says in a gentler tone. Starve? Work like slaves? Send their kids to the reaping? You haven’t hurt people – you’ve given them an opportunity. They just have to be brave enough to take it.” – Suzanne Collins

I bite my lip, feeling inferior. While I’ve been ruminating on the availability of trees, Peeta has been struggling with how to maintain his identity. His purity of self. – Suzanne Collins

What am I going to do? I take a deep breath. My arms raise slightly – as if recalling the black-and-white wings Cinna gave me – then come to rest at my sides. I’m going to be the Mockingjay. – Suzanne Collins

I’m taken aback by the directness and even the sincerity of this speech. As if his primary concern is the welfare of the citizens of Panem, when nothing could be further from the truth. I don’t know how I dare to say the next words, but I do. It must be very fragile, if a handful of berries can bring it down. – Suzanne Collins

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