31+ Best Mary Shelley Quotes: Exclusive Selection

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was an English novelist who wrote the Gothic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, which is considered an early example of science fiction. She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Profoundly inspirational Mary Shelley quotes will challenge the way you think, change the way you live and transform your whole life.

If you’re searching for meaningful quotes by authors that perfectly capture what you’d like to say or just want to feel inspired yourself, browse through an amazing collection of amazing Mary Wollstonecraft quotes, top Mel Robbins quotes and best Mitch Albom quotes.

Famous Mary Shelley Quotes

My heart was fashioned to be susceptible of love and sympathy, and when wrenched by misery to vice and hatred, it did not endure the violence of the change without torture such as you cannot even imagine. — Mary Shelley

Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world. — Mary Shelley

The agony of my feelings allowed me no respite; no incident occurred from which my rage and misery could not extract its food . . . — Mary Shelley

It is hardly surprising that women concentrate on the way they look instead of what is in their minds since not much has been put in their minds to begin with. — Mary Shelley

The very winds whispered in soothing accents, and maternal Nature bade me weep no more. — Mary Shelley

I do not wish them to have power over men, but over themselves. — Mary Shelley

My dreams were at once more fantastic and agreeable than my writings. — Mary Shelley

You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you,as mine has been. — Mary Shelley

Be men, or be more than men. Be steady to your purposes and firm as a rock. This ice is not made of such stuff as your hearts may be; it is mutable and cannot withstand you if you say that it shall not. — Mary Shelley

But I am a blasted tree; the bolt has entered my soul; and I felt then that I should survive to exhibit what I shall soon cease to be – a miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable to others and intolerable to myself. — Mary Shelley

Man, I cried, how ignorant art thou in thy pride of wisdom! — Mary Shelley

I shall live to improve myself, to take care of my child and to render myself worthy to join him. Soon my weary pilgrimage will begin. — Mary Shelley

Standing armies can never consist of resolute robust men; they may be well-disciplined machines, but they will seldom contain men under the influence of strong passions, or with very vigorous faculties. — Mary Shelley

My dreams were all my own; I accounted for them to nobody; they were my refuge when annoyed – my dearest pleasure when free. — Mary Shelley

Life is obstinate and clings closest where it is most hated. — Mary Shelley

Nothing contributes so much to tranquilizing the mind as a steady purpose — a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye. — Mary Shelley

It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs. — Mary Shelley

I thought and pondered – vainly. I felt that blank incapability of invention which is the greatest misery of authorship, when dull Nothing replies to our anxious invocations. — Mary Shelley

If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections, and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is not befitting the human mind. — Mary Shelley

And now, once again, I bid my hideous progeny go forth and prosper. I have an affection for it, for it was the offspring of happy days, when death and grief were but words, which found no true echo in my heart. — Mary Shelley

My spirits were elevated by the enchanting appearance of nature; the past was blotted from my memory, the present was tranquil, and the future gilded by bright rays of hope and anticipations of joy. — Mary Shelley

I am very averse to bringing myself forward in print, but as my account will only appear as an appendage to a former production, and as it will be confined to such topics as have connection with my authorship alone, I can hardly accuse myself of a personal intrusion. — Mary Shelley

It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open . . . — Mary Shelley

The scene of my existence is closed & though there be no pleasure in retracing the scenes that have preceded the event which has crushed my hopes yet there seems to be a necessity in doing so, and I obey the impulse that urges me. — Mary Shelley

I beheld the wretch – the miserable monster whom I had created — Mary Shelley

At boarding schools the relaxation of the junior boys is mischief, and of the seniors vice — Mary Shelley

It is a farce to call any being virtuous whose virtues do not result from the exercise of it’s own reason. — Mary Shelley

Women are told from their infancy, and taught by the example of their mothers, that a little knowledge of human weakness, justly termed cunning, softness of temper, outward obedience and a scrupulous attention to a puerile kind of propriety, will obtain for them the protection of man. — Mary Shelley

Teach him to think for himself? Oh, my God, teach him rather to think like other people! — Mary Shelley

What terrified me will terrify others; and I need only describe the spectre which had haunted my midnight pillow. — Mary Shelley

Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of the void, but out of chaos; the materials must, in the first place, be afforded: it can give form to dark, shapeless substances, but cannot bring into being the substance itself. — Mary Shelley

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