20+ Best Mao Zedong Poems

Mao Zedong, also known as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese communist revolutionary who became the founding father of the People’s Republic of China, which he ruled as the chairman of the Communist Party of China from its establishment in 1949 until his death in 1976.

If you’re searching for famous poems ever that perfectly capture what you’d like to say or just want to feel inspired yourself, browse through an amazing collection of selected Dante Alighieri poems, best known Robert Southey poems and most famous Donald Hall poems.

Famous Mao Zedong Poems

Militia Women Inscription On A Photograph

How bright and brave they look, shouldering five-foot rifles
On the parade ground lit up by the first gleams of day.
China’s daughters have high-aspiring minds,
They love their battle array, not silks and satins.

Chingkangshan

Below the hills fly our flags and banners,
Above the hilltops sound our bugles and drums.
The foe encircles us thousands strong,
Steadfastly we stand our ground.
Already our defence is iron-clad,
Now our wills unite like a fortress.
From Huangyangchieh roars the thunder of guns,
Word comes the enemy has fled into the night.

Tapoti

Red, orange, yellow, green,
blue, violet, indigo:
Who is dancing with these
rainbow colours in the sky?
Air after rain, slanting sun:
mountains and passes turning blue
in each changing moment.
Fierce battles that year:
bullet holes in village walls.
These mountains so decorated,
look even more beautiful today.

March From Tingchow To Changsha

In June Heaven’s armies chastise the corrupt and evil,
Seeking to bind roc and whale with a league-long cord.
Red glows the far side of the Kan,
Thanks to our wing under Huang Kung-lueh.
A million workers and peasants rise up,
Sweeping Kiangsi straight towards Hunan and Hupeh.
To the Internationale’s stirring strains
A wild whirlwind swoops from the sky.

Peitaiho

A rainstorm sweeps down on this northern land,
White breakers leap to the sky.
No fishing boats off Chinwangtao
Are seen on the boundless ocean.
Where are they gone?
Nearly two thousand years ago
Wielding his whip, the Emperor Wu of Wei
Rode eastward to Chiehshih; his poem survives.
Today the autumn wind still sighs,
But the world has changed!

The Fairy Cave Inscription On A Picture Taken By Comrade Li Chin

Amid the growing shades of dusk stand sturdy pines,
Riotous clouds sweep past, swift and tranquil.
Nature has excelled herself in the Fairy Cave,
On perilous peaks dwells beauty in her infinite variety.

The People’s Liberation Army Captures Nanking

Over Chungshan swept a storm, headlong,
Our mighty army, a million strong, has crossed the Great River.
The City, a tiger crouching, a dragon curling, outshines its ancient glories;
In heroic triumph heaven and earth have been overturned.
With power and to spare we must pursue the tottering foe
And not ape Hsiang Yu the conqueror seeking idle fame.
Were Nature sentient, she too would pass from youth to age,
But Man’s world is mutable, seas become mulberry fields.

The Warlords Clash

Sudden veer of wind and rain
Showering misery through the land,
The warlords are clashing anew —
Yet another Millet Dream.
Red banners leap over Ting River
Straight to Longyan and Shanghang.
We have reclaimed part of the Golden Vase
And land is being shared out with a will.

Yellow Crane Tower

Wide, wide flow the nine streams through the land,
Dark, dark threads the line from south to north.
Blurred in the thick haze of the misty rain
Tortoise and Snake hold the great river locked.
The yellow crane is gone, who knows whither?
Only this tower remains a haunt for visitors.
I pledge my wine to the surging torrent,
The tide of my heart swells with the waves.

The PLA Captures Nanjing

Over Zhong Mountain swept a storm, headlong,
Our mighty army, a million strong, has crossed the Great River.
The city, a tiger crouching, a dragon curling,
outshining its ancient glory;
In heroic triumph heaven and earth have been overturned.
With power and to spare we must pursue the tottering foe
And not ape Xiang Yu the conqueror seeking idle fame.
Were Nature sentient, she too would pass from youth to age,
But man’s world is mutable, seas become mulberry fields.

Two Birds: a Dialogue

The roc wings fanwise,
Soaring ninety thousand li
And rousing a raging cyclone.
The blue sky on his back, he looks down
To survey Man’s world with its towns and cities.
Gunfire licks the heavens,
Shells pit the earth.
A sparrow in his bush is scared stiff.
“This is one hell of a mess!
Oh I want to flit and fly away.”

“Where, may I ask?”
The sparrow relies,
“To a jewelled palace in elfland’s hills.
Don’t you see a triple pact was signed
Under the bright autumn moon two years ago?
There will be plenty to eat,
Potatoes piping hot,
beef-filled goulash.”
“Don’t farce any more!
Look, the world is being turned upside down.”

Against the Second

The very clouds foams atop White Cloud Mountain,
At its base the roar of battle quicken.
Withered trees and rotten stumps join in the fray.
A forest of rifles presses,
As the flying General descends from the skies.

In fifteen days we have marched seven hundred li
Cross misty Gan waters and green Fujian hills,
Rolling back the enemy as we would a mat.
A voice is heard wailing;
His “Bastion at every step” avail him nought!

March from Tingzhou to Changsha

In June Heaven’s armies chastise the corrupt and evil,
Seeking to bind roc and whale with a league-long cord.
Red glows the far side of the River Gan,
Thanks to our wing under Huang Gonglyue.

A million workers and peasants rise up,
Sweeping Jiangxi straight towards Hunan and Hubei.
To the Internationale’s stirring strains
A wild whirlwind swoops from the sky.

New Year’s Day

Ninghua, Qingliu, Guihua —
What narrow paths, deep woods and slippery moss!
Whither are we bound today?
Straight to the foot of Wuyi Mountain.
To the mountain, the foot of the mountain,
Red flags stream in the wind in a blaze of glory.

Huichang

Soon dawn will break in the east.
Do not say “You start too early”;
Crossing these blue hills adds nothing to one’s years,
The landscape here is beyond compare.

Straight from the walls of Huichang lofty peaks,
Range after ranges, extend to the eastern sea.
Our soldiers point southward to Guangdong
Looming lusher and greener in the distance.

Against the First

Forests blaze red beneath the frosty sky,
The wrath of Heaven’s armies soars to the clouds.
Mist veils Longgang, its thousands peaks blurred.
All cry out in unison:
Our van has taken Zhang Huizan!

The enemy returns to Jiangxi two hundred thousand strong,
Fumes billowing in the wind in mid-sky.
Workers and peasants are wakened in their millions
To fight as one man,
Under the riot of red flags round the foot of Buzhou Mountain!

On the Guangchang Road

The whole wide world is white,
Through the snow eagerly we press on.
Crags loom above our heads,
We cross the great pass, red flags waving in the wind.

Where are we bound?
To the snow-swept River Gan.
Yesterday the order was given,
One hundred thousand workers and peasants march to Ji’an.

Ascent of Lu Mountain

Perching as after flight, the mountain towers over the Yangtze;
I have overleapt four hundred twists to its green crest.
Cold-eyed I survey the world beyond seas;
A hot wind spatters raindrops on the sky-brooded waters.
Clouds cluster over the nine streams, the yellow crane floating,
And billows roll on to the eastern coast, white foam flying.
Who knows whither Prefect Tao Yuanming is gone
Now that he can till fields in the Land of Peach Blooming?

Snow

North country scene:
A hundred leagues locked in ice,
A thousand leagues of whirling snow.
Both side of the Great Wall
One single white immensity.
The Yellow River’s swift current
Is stilled from end to end.
The mountains dance silver snakes
And the highland charge like wax-hued elephants.
Vying with heaven in stature.
On a fine day, the land,
Clad in white, adorned in red,
Crows more enchanting.

This land so rich in beauty
Has made countless heroes bow in homage.
But alas! Qin Shihuang and Han Wudi
Were lacking in literary grace,
And Tang Taizong and Song Taizu
Had little poetry in their souls;
That proud son of Heaven,
Genghis Khan,
Knew only shooting eagles, bow outstretched.
All are past and gone!
For truly great men
Look to this age alone.

The Fairy Cave

Inscription on a Picture Taken by Comrade Li Jin

Amid the growing shades of dusk stand sturdy pines,
Riotous clouds sweep past, swift and tranquil.
Nature has excelled herself in the Fairy Cave,
On perilous peaks dwells beauty in her infinite variety.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.